HOW WE CAN HELP EACH OTHER

How. We can help each other

As I read other blogs on bipolar, I am trying to figure out how I can both help myself as well as others. I have some questions for my readers who also have their own blogs or can give me recommendations. My hope is to get some input from you.

1. I want some recommendations on how you get responses and people to follow your blog?

2. Do you find any help or insight with my blog?

I know it is different than most as it is both educational as well as personal. Having said that the only input I have received back have been from non bipolar friends who have provide3d words of encouragement. This makes me feel I am not helping people who are bipolar or deeply depressed at times, families and friends of bipolar people or even medical professionals who may be learning about bipolar to better help their clients.

3. Do you feel your blogs are more like journals to help yourself release your current life’s issues or are you too trying to better the world and reach out to those who are trying to understand themselves and if this is something that they can figure out if then need help..

In a nutshell this actually makes me feel a blog isn’t my vehicle and becoming a waste of my time.

Another reason why I ask is my family siblings 3 of whom are bipolar ( one unmedicated and in denial) and 3 who are on drugs for depression and anxiety, didn’t care enough to read this blog. My hopes were so positive. I wanted them to ‘put their money where there mouth is’ as they proclaimed over the years they didn’t understand bipolar and wanted to so much because they love me. Sigh

Hopefully I can get some help here.

Thanks,

Liz

6 thoughts on “HOW WE CAN HELP EACH OTHER

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  1. 1. People just find me and my blog. Sometimes I use tags but most of the time not. Responses are bit more diifficult to get. I don’t get as much as I would like, but I think a lot of the time people just don’t know what to say. I find that people do say something when I’m having an extra difficult time, which I find quite comforting.

    2.The main thing I get from blogs is not feeling alone. Knowing that people have the same if not similar experiences as me. That is what has me interested most in blogs and why I follow the ones that I do.

    3.My blog has changed. I started it as a helpful resource and it ended up being a journal of sorts instead. I’m not sure how people like it best, but having a journal of sorts seems to be helping me out most currently.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. 1) Because I’m anonymous and no one knows I do this, I didn’t get to use any existing social contacts to grow my blog. It started with strangers finding my blog through search engines. I’m one of a handful of blogs that discusses living with PANS from a first-person perspective, so my uniqueness and people’s desperation for information on PANS has fueled my following. I think some people have found me through my Twitter and my Facebook page, too, for the same reasons. People respond when I write the unvarnished truth and put things into words that some struggle to articulate themselves. When you find your voice and tell your truth, people will relate. I’d suggest finding what makes you and your story unique and running with it.

    2) I’ve liked what I’ve read on your blog so far! The main thing that illness-related blogs do for me is make me realize I’m not alone. Reading about other people’s experiences is validating, and it’s helpful to read about what you’ve learned in your journey. The educational stuff is good, but stories tend to grab my attention the most. I don’t see any reason why you can’t have both, though!

    3) I try to strike a balance between making my blog a form of personal release and what I think my readers want/need to read. That said, what people connect to the most is me being real and genuine. The rawest posts that I’m afraid to share are the ones people write to me to say thanks for posting it. The art of blogging (to me) is telling your story in the most compelling way possible in order to keep people reading, but in doing so, you always should be true to yourself and what really happened. My advice is to not try to make your blog anything at first—just write and let it tell you what it wants to become. Write what you feel inspired to write.

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  3. Thank you for this I am 61 and got diagnosed 23 years ago which means 37 years of non diagnosis and struggling to survive and understand. Having said that. I think a lot and try to understand my foundation and survival techniques and behavior on both sides of the pendulum. But here’s the thing. Inasmuch as I have started this blog and ‘unveiled’ two big stories. I am too nervous to bring it to other social media. I know everyone knows someone who is bi polar and can benefit but my life stories are beyond belief for many. Also this exposes my heart flaws and embarrassment of my past experience

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi Lizzy, as for getting people to visit your blog – comment on other people’s post regularly. I find the blogging community really friendly and supportive of their fellow bloggers. Are you on Twitter (I am) of Facebook, (I’m not as I’m not ready to go that public with my family and friends — yet)

    I like what you’ve written so far. Don’t give up. Yes, people do need to be made aware of bipolar disorders along with other mental health problems. Who better to write it – than the person who (with her family) have experienced it? As you’ve just started your blog, you could mix it up a bit i.e. bipolar posts about diagnosis, treatment, medication and side effects etc. You could write all kinds of stuff like poetry, life lessons, quotes blah, blah — as long as you’re ‘real’, passionate about your topic and write from the heart.

    Looking forward to seeing you progress. Caz x

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  5. Thanks. So funny you should mention other social media. Like you, I am not ready for that. I feel although Facebook is a powerful medium. It for me is a post ‘Let’s go Pats,Sox,bruins,celtics’. Or let’s look at our memory photos. Having said that I do believe everyone knows some one who has this condition and I know I could help. But not ready. Not sure if I ever will be

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